CALENDULA


CALENDULA. IN certain grey house in a certain grey street the two lower windows act as beacons of light to the whole neighbourhood by sending out rays of joy and happiness, at any rate to one passer- by, for inside the windows, lighting them up are enormous garlands of flowers, topped, practically all the year round by the golden orb of the Calendula or Marigold, which is tastefully and artistically interspersed by branches of different shades of green.


A GREAT WOUND REMEDY.

IN certain grey house in a certain grey street the two lower windows act as beacons of light to the whole neighbourhood by sending out rays of joy and happiness, at any rate to one passer- by, for inside the windows, lighting them up are enormous garlands of flowers, topped, practically all the year round by the golden orb of the Calendula or Marigold, which is tastefully and artistically interspersed by branches of different shades of green. The Marigold is one of the most decorative flowing that I know; its colour reflects the health-giving qualities of the warming and healing sunlight.

If there is anything in colour therapy, this herb certainly seems to emanate it, for its blossoms open to the daylight and sun and close as the sun descends to the lower horizon. It is lick a clock, the flowers open at 9 in the morning, and close punctually at 3 p.m., and it taken no notice of the daylight-saving bill of the humans. This peculiarity has been noticed by many writers in the past. Shakespeare refers to it in “The Winters Tale:.

“The Marigold that goes to bed with the sun.

And with him rises weeping.”.

The name Calendula is derived from the fact that it is said to open its blood on the calends (the first days of the month), and Marigold is associated by some writers with the Virgin Mary and by others with Queen Mary of Stuart fame.

For centuries it has been a pot herb and the flowers were dried for soups and broths; and a yellow dye was extracted from them for colouring cheeses.

The old herbalists, Gerard and Culpepper, refer to it “as a comforter of the heart and spirit”; but modern medicine and modern cookery ignore this this old-fashioned herb. In these days of cocktails and chain-smoking, the art of cooking has been forgotten and we like to live out of the famous 57 varieties of tine. We only see tins in our store cupboards not the dried flower heads of our ancestors, which gave flavours to their dishes and soups and infusions. Such a pity !

Modern medicine too, like the pharisee, walks proudly by and taken no notice of the humble herbs of the fields; all thee drugs must come from the smoking stills of the analytical chemists,m and be tested out on the living bodies of innocent and suffering animals, before they are passed as suitable-for a short time-in the experimental kitchen of the up-to-days analyst, who then passes them on to the credulous son of Aesculapius to dispense to suffering humanity and with accounts of their effects in the medical press, until they are superseded by a more recent product of the art of the manufacturer.

The present war makes ones thoughts turn to First Aid and the treatment of wounds. Sepsis is the great danger of open wounds and injuries, and antiseptics are the answer of the surgeon o this enemy. Unfortunately antiseptics which are potent enough to kill the micro organisms are also injurious to the living cells of body and the defending white blood corpuscles which are sent out to kill off the attacking microbes: Carbolic Acid, and the mercurial salts and iodine play havoc with the leucocytes well as with the deadly germs, and even the more recent antiseptics are only a degree better. The ideal antiseptic is still being searched for.

Iodine is the usual advice given for local treatment for cuts and abrasions. Here and there a voice of warning is raised which condemns his indiscriminate use of Iodine to abrasions of the skin and open wounds, as Iodine burns and tans the skin and allows the germs to invade the deeper tissues underneath. Aseptic treatment or surgical cleanliness with plenty of warm soap is much better then pouring Iodine or other antiseptics on to wounds. The Bible mentions the use of wine as a vulnerary; alas the rabid teetotaller of the generation has made the moderate use of wine and its use in medicine impossible by heavy taxation and we have to look round for other substances.

Here it is, we high ourselves back to Marigold. It is the best homoeopathic wound dressing and antiseptic that I know. Alas ! that so few, even keen homoeopaths, appreciate its value as such. I worked for years in various homoeopathic hospitals and never saw it used; we used the same lotions and tinctures and dressings as the orthodox hospitals. And yet there were a few valiant spirits who prescribed the use of Calendula in would treatment. There was Dr. Carleton, who used it in peace time in his hospital in America for all kinds of operations.

Calendula officinalis is THE SIMILAR to clean cuts, would with or without loss of substance, sharp cutting pains, redness, rawness and sometimes stinging pains during febrile heat. There are the indications in the Materia Medica, and this has been proved to be correct in practice. Carleton states he prefers the succus Calendula to the tincture. In haemorrhage he states that a douche of clear tincture of Calendula acts like magic and promotes rapid healing. I have proved the truth of this myself in several instances. I was looking on once while a veterinary nurse was docking the tails of some pedigree puppies of a few days old.

Dorothy Shepherd
Dorothy Shepherd 1885 – 1952 - British orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy. Graduated from Hering College in Chicago. She was a pupil of J.T.Kent. Author of Magic of the Minimum Dose, More Magic of the Minimum Dose, A Physician's Posy, Homeopathy in Epidemic Diseases.