CARRIWITCHETS


The tapeworm immediately begins to feed on this, which produces a soporific effect upon the worm, and his tentacles let go their hold. Once they have let go, they do not anchor themselves again, and the worm is expelled in entirety. This I call mechanical removal, because it is his inability to use his anchorage and he must pass out with the natural peristalsis.


SIT DOWN, DOCTOR, AND WRITE US YOUR ANSWERS TO THESE QUESTIONS.

Will every Recorder reader in this country and abroad please give a keen attention to the editorial Dragons Teeth in this issue and very serious consideration to the important problem there presented? Will each one then send answers embodying their suggestions to the two questions following? We need many angles from many minds as we are prepared to act on suggestions. This is a problem of the greatest importance to us all and to the future of homoeopathy. Such answers should be sent to the Editor-in- Chief. Dr. Elizabeth Wright, 472 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Mass.

20. Will anyone who knows of any homoeopathic education which is now being conducted in this country or abroad please send an outline of the details to the Recorder?-E. WRIGHT.

21. How can we best recruit our homoeopathic ranks?-E. WRIGHT.

22. A man was given Kali carb. for asthma with splendid results. A few minutes after the first dose of the 200th he had severe dizziness, the table and floor swung up and down, it was so severe he had to be helped to bed. Shortly after the second dose, also the 200th, he had a very severe headache across the frontal region which lasted 8 hours. The pain was sharp, piercing and took away all his ambition. He had never had a headache like this and had had no headaches of any kind for some years. There was no known cause for either of these two attacks. What was the cause? Was it a reaction to the Kali carb.?-E. LYLE.

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS IN THE MAY ISSUE.

What should be given to a tubercular patient when Sulphur seems plainly indicated?.

-In advanced cases of phthisis, with early morning diarrhoea driving the patient out of bed, where the physician would think of Sulphur, but where Sulphur might cause grave aggravations. Rumex crispus has proved of great value in meeting the conditions, without causing the aggravations. Kent said that in cases of tuberculosis, with burning in the chest, severe pains in the larynx and trachea when talking, cough ending in belching, heat in palms and soles, Sanguinaria canadensis will act well, although Sulphur apparently was indicated; but Sanguinaria will palliate the conditions and will actually build up the patient to a point where he can receive with great benefit a deeper acting remedy in a medium high potency.-H.A. ROBERTS.

How does one mechanically remove a tapeworm?.

-I usually use the heart of the pumpkin seed. Have a druggist make an emulsion of about one ounce of the shelled seeds, and have the patient take this on an empty stomach. The tapeworm immediately begins to feed on this, which produces a soporific effect upon the worm, and his tentacles let go their hold. Once they have let go, they do not anchor themselves again, and the worm is expelled in entirety. This I call mechanical removal, because it is his inability to use his anchorage and he must pass out with the natural peristalsis.-H.A. ROBERTS.

These writings and records of the masters, these rare old books and magazines of ours, and the transactions of the I.H.A., containing the choicest thought and experience of those who were near the fountain head, both in time and the spirit, the masters own works-if you do not possess them, seek for them as gold- seekers pursue the yellow metal. Haunt old book stores, junk shops, auction sales of libraries, consult the experts for information. These writings are scarce; but they exist, and they may be found.

When you find them, buy them, renovate and rebind them, and put them on the middle shelf of your bookcase, just on a level with your heart, where you can read and take them down easily.

Cherish them, study as models for your own work. Saturate your mind with them.-STUART CLOSE.

Allan D. Sutherland