CARRIWITCHETS


In an attenuated remedy this envelop or container is so broken up that the little that remains acts instantly by its container being immediately broken open and the entire power being freed all at one time, its contained power acting and passing off instantly so that all that remains is the continued result or effect of that action which must be met quite differently from that of the pre-action of the so-called crude drug.


SIT DOWN, DOCTOR, AND WRITE US YOUR ANSWERS TO THESE.

QUESTIONS

4. The mother tincture of Calendula, on keeping a few months, shows a deposit. Is this deposit detrimental and, if so, should it be filtered off before using? Not long ago, I asked a doctor, a homoeopath, whether Calendula was as good as tincture of iodine for immediate local application to injuries such as cuts, lacerations by garden tools, animals bites or scratches (especially of dogs and cats). He told me that Calendula has as much antiseptic power as iodine, and advised me to use the iodine. Would an expert kindly give his opinion about this?- A.H.MARSHALL.

5. Under what remedies does the symptoms “sucking the thumb” come?-A. PULFORD.

6. For what remedies are the following the abbreviations: Scleros., Egg vac., Gland. supra sic.? From what gland is the last made?-E.LYLE.

ANSWER TO QUESTIONS IN NOVEMBER ISSUE.

What principles are to guide the prescriber in improvising an antidote?.

-An inquiry has come asking just what I meant by the word “relativity” in replying to the above query.

To antidote properly is to counteract or neutralize a direct poison; to “antidote” (which is a misnomer) homoeopathically is to counteract the direct results of the effects of a poison.

When we spoke of the word relativity in our answer we had this in mind, taking Rhus as an example. Neither remedy nor poison act alike on each and every patient or person, therefore the so-called antidote must, in its choice, relate to both the symptoms of the patient and the peculiar symptoms that both the remedy to be administered and the remedy to be “antidoted” bear to each other.

For example, Rhus has listed 10 antidotes as follows: Bry., Bell., Camph., Coff., Crot. tig., Grind., Merc., Sang., Sul. and Verb.h. Bell., therefore, will antidote Rhus only, then,in a Bell. patient, so that the so-called antidote MUST bear relation to the symptoms of the patient who would otherwise call for Bell. plus those symptoms, otherwise Bell. would either be entirely useless or only do partial work. They must all correspond if perfect work is to be done. Possibly we may be mistaken in this and what we have said may not be logical, but since no remedy has a FIXED antidote how shall we work the matter out in any other way?.

It is said that rabbits can thrive in fields of Belladonna;a that pigeons can take 12 grs. of morphia, and dogs as much as 37 grs.; that a hedgehog can take as much morphia as a Chinaman can smoke in a fortnight and wash it down with as much prussic acid as will kill a regiment of soldiers, etc. The power to poison seems, then, not to be in the crude envelop or container of the real drug, but in the power of the body to liberate the contained power therein.

Therefore, the antidoting consists not in neutralizing the drug but in rendering the system incapable of acting on the remedys container or envelope. In an attenuated remedy this envelop or container is so broken up that the little that remains acts instantly by its container being immediately broken open and the entire power being freed all at one time, its contained power acting and passing off instantly so that all that remains is the continued result or effect of that action which must be met quite differently from that of the pre-action of the so-called crude drug.-A. PULFORD.

Allan D. Sutherland