THE ANTIDOTE


The commonly accepted idea of an antidote is that it is something to change the character of the agent to be antidoted. This common concept of the operation is, we think entirely wrong. Again, each drug represents a fixed power that can under no circumstance be changed. But no operations can take place in this antidoting.


The commonly accepted idea of an antidote is that it is something to change the character of the agent to be antidoted. This common concept of the operation is, we think entirely wrong. Again, each drug represents a fixed power that can under no circumstance be changed. But no operations can take place in this antidoting.

First, if the two opposing forces are equal in power, they bring each other to a standstill ; second, the opposing or antidotal drug may so change the bodily secretions as to render them incapable of acting on the drugs physical container thus rendering its power inescapable and thus the drug passes out of the body an inert mass.

The so-called homoeopathic antidoting is an entirely different proposition. It does not neutralize anything, for there is nothing there tangible to be neutralized or opposed. The so- called antidote merely sets up an effect of its own to neutralize, not the preceding remedy, but the result of that remedys action.

-A PULFORD, M.D.

The Homoeopathic Recorder, vol. XLV., No. 12.

N C Bose