Editorial


For this extension no reason appears to have been given by the department concerned, but obviously they thought it wise to wait until elections to the provincial legislature are over and the Ministry settle down to work. Thus, the Registered Homoeopathic practitioners will have full twelve months at their disposal to deliberate and choose their representatives on the General Council, and also enable publication of the list of registered practitioners and make it available to the public.


Apropos of our editorial last month, we have pleasure to cater to our readers the interesting news that the Local Government have extended the term of office of the present nominated members of the General Council by one year i.e., from 31st March 1946 to 31st. March 1947, vide Notification No. Medl. 3H-31/45 of 12,1,1946. Our article referred to above has elicited this advice from the Registrar of the State Faculty to whom we are beholden for this information.

For this extension no reason appears to have been given by the department concerned, but obviously they thought it wise to wait until elections to the provincial legislature are over and the Ministry settle down to work. Thus, the Registered Homoeopathic practitioners will have full twelve months at their disposal to deliberate and choose their representatives on the General Council, and also enable publication of the list of registered practitioners and make it available to the public.

With all respects to punctilio we would ask out readers to note that amongst the public bodies privileged to elect members, the Bengal Assembly and the Bengal Council each will elect one member in the formation of the next General Council; these two will no more be nominated members, in terms of section 2 (K) of the Statute.

It would not be out of place to invite thoughtful attention of all registered Homoeopathic medical practitioners to the Committees report and recommendations in respect of health administration and health service in local areas in provinces. The Committee condescended to cast a side glance at the two indigenous systems of medicine, viz., Unani and Ayurvedic, and made the following remark: “The Committee suggests that it should be left to the Provincial Government to decide what part, if any, should be played by the indigenous systems in the organisation of public health and medical relief.

They point out that public health of preventive medicine is not within the purview of the indigenous systems which is not within the purview of the indigenous systems which also do not deal with such aspects of medicine as obstetrics, gynecology, and advanced surgery. The scientific systems of medicine, they consider, must be regarded as neither Eastern or Western but as a corpus of scientific knowledge and practice belonging to the whole world.” This scathing denunciation of the ingenious systems of medicine can only be due to thorough ignorance, and it must also be noted retard of progress are solely due to State apathy from which Homoeopathy has non-the-less suffering, The Bhore Committee has not stooped to make even a casual mention of Homoeopathy anywhere in its lengthy report. Have the registered Homoeopathic medical practitioners thought over the incompetence forced while the licentiates of the allopathic State Faculty are freely admitted to these diploma courses?.

N C Bose