EDITORIAL


The homoeopathic physician is fortunate indeed to have a clearly defined law of cure to guide him in the practice of his profession. He need not tremble as he approaches the amazing labyrinth of a fully equipped modern laboratory. Nor need he worry if he saves his patients some of their hard earned money by omitting unnecessary and expensive laboratory studies.


It is necessary (1) to question the accuracy of all laboratory reports, (2) to repeat tests the results of which appear to be erroneous, and (3) to weigh carefully reports that do not agree with our clinical impressions.–Penna. Med. Journal, June, 1944, page 883.

The above is an authoritative, up-to-the-minute evaluation of laboratory science as it stands today in its service to the medical profession. Our confidence in laboratory reports sinks to a new low when anything as nebulous and intangible as clinical impressions may overrule them.

The homoeopathic physician is fortunate indeed to have a clearly defined law of cure to guide him in the practice of his profession. He need not tremble as he approaches the amazing labyrinth of a fully equipped modern laboratory. Nor need he worry if he saves his patients some of their hard earned money by omitting unnecessary and expensive laboratory studies. The more a physician suffers from “indolence and love of ease” the more will he be inclined to rely on the laboratory. His own indefatigable effort will yield far better results in the vast majority of cases.

Allan D. Sutherland