HOMOEOPATHIC RESEARCH


Formation of smaller or larger mixed groups of provers, consisting of doctors and laymen, would make possible the accomplishment of this work. The various existing homoeopathic laymens organizations could be of the greatest service to the cause of homoeopathy by lending their assistance.


For practical purposes, homoeopathic research work can be divided into two great groups :.

GROUP I. Research not requiring money.

GROUP II. Research requiting money.

I begin with Group I which is more readily attainable for obvious reason, and wish to subdivide this group into a two group:.

A. Clinical Research.

B. Theoretical Research.

I. HOMOEOPATHIC RESEARCH NOT REQUIRING MONEY.

A. CLINICAL RESEARCH.

First of all, homoeopathy is not a theoretical but clinical science, as it is set forth with monumental terseness in the first paragraph of the Organon : “The first and only duty of the physicians is to cure.” Therefore, provings done for this purpose alone, and clinical observations of drug effects at the bedside, will always constitute the fundamentals of research in homoeopathy.

1. Provings of Drugs.

Although the homoeopathic materia medica is richer than any other materia medica in existence, the introduction of new proved medicines will always be welcome and even necessary. We often have to struggle with pathological conditions which do not seem to fit any given drug picture altogether, and, therefore, demand a sequence of remedies, which sometimes still does not give completely satisfactory results. There are many powerful agents in the various kingdoms of nature which could furnish remedies capable of covering disorders such as those mentioned above.

Besides, it is safe to say that each era has not only its own characteristic mental, economical and cultural physiognomy, but also its own characteristic diseases. For this reason too, it may be necessary to discover new drugs, fitting the particular traits that disease take on in a certain era, or fitting even entirely new pathological condition. The polychrests will always be useful. Their usefulness is as unchangeable as human nature basically is. However, at the same time, there is within the frame of human nature a steady flow and change of conditions.

There are certain more recently discovered agents which are particularly inviting for homoeopathic provings, such as the great group of bacterial toxins, used as vaccines, and the group of vitamins. Apart from the provings of new remedies, a re- proving of the old, particularly of the minor remedies which have not as yet been proved as thoroughly as they certainly deserve, is highly recommendable. If possible, modern means of psychological observation and laboratory tests should be utilized to bring provings up to date.

Formation of smaller or larger mixed groups of provers, consisting of doctors and laymen, would make possible the accomplishment of this work. The various existing homoeopathic laymens organizations could be of the greatest service to the cause of homoeopathy by lending their assistance.

The setting up of a central council which, year after year, would choose the drugs so to be proved and would supervise the work to be done in the various provings units-each under the direction of a homoeopathic physician-would guarantee planned, organized work. The formation of similar councils in other countries, working under the same plan, and coordination of all these effects on a world-wide scale would certainly produce the greatest practical results.

2. Observation of Occupational Diseases in Mining Districts and in Factories.

Additional sources of knowledge of the effect of chemical and other poisons are the factories. Homoeopathic physicians living in mining districts and factories. Homoeopathic physicians living in the vicinity of mining districts, particularly if in charge of health supervision of workers, are in a position to collect valuable toxicological material which can be used, supplementing provings.

William Gutman