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Examine visually the patient, noting every characteristic discernible, forming as far as practicable a general opinion of personality, mind, and body. In any case, with rare exception, the prescriber will be able to determine the similimum in potency as well as the remedy similimum. An exact estimate of the case provides a safe and effective choice of potency.


The Homoeopathic Recorder:.

I enclose herewith an article by the late Dr. John Hutchinson of New York and Manchester, Connecticut, that came to me in the way of correspondence. The doctor and I exchanged views, problems and their solutions in this way many years. He was fond of writing what were really short articles on the questions and observations that came up in his practice. These he would jot down on a post card or sheet and send it on.

At times this kind of exchange took a fast pace, almost a daily routine. After a while Dr. Plumb Brown joined in and later several others. Thus we often had lively times by mail. It would seem that something of the kind should find ready acceptance at this time. The exchange of clinical items and points of view were quite profitable for me, at least.

Dr. Hutchinson was an astute prescriber, by nature consecrated to homoeopathic science and practice. He was a homoeopathic aristocrat and his work justified the impulses of an incorruptible homoeopathic ideal.

ROYAL HAYES.

Let me submit for your discussion the following:

1. The potency must fit the gravity of the case. Age, vitality, reactive power of the organism, cause, chronicity, these and all other factors to be measured.

2. The low potency fits the simple case. It may require repetition. Higher may be demanded for complete cure.

3. Low potencies range from the 6th to the 60th. Medium potencies from the 200th to 1000th. High from 1000th up.

4. It would be a mistake to prescribe the highest potency of the remedy in extremis when the power of reaction is low. The medium potency is preferable.

5. For the lower grades of disorder, or when the disorder is apparently limited to structures and tissues outside the mental and nerve functions, low potencies often cure speedily.

6. The larger the mental side of the case, whatever the bodily ailment, the higher the potency required when the remedy is well-chosen.

7. The accurately chosen remedy may require no repetition. This, however, depends on the chronicity, with other possible factors.

8. In any case of any grade the lower potency used at first with benefit may need to be followed by the higher or even the highest.

9. In many families the children respond best to medium and low potencies.

10. The more complex the case as to history, successive illness, bad treatment, bad effects of surgery, the less medicine, but the most care in selection of appropriate remedy and its potency.

11. The essential intercurrent should be infrequent: minimum number.

12. If the high potency gives little or no result in reasonable time it should be superseded by a lower.

13. As soon as improvement is at a standstill under the low a higher should be chosen, provided of course the original picture persists.

14. If the picture has changed and a new remedy is selected the potency should fit the new aspect of the case in respect to patients habit of reaction as disclosed and studied.

15. Examine visually the patient, noting every characteristic discernible, forming as far as practicable a general opinion of personality, mind, and body. In any case, with rare exception, the prescriber will be able to determine the similimum in potency as well as the remedy similimum. An exact estimate of the case provides a safe and effective choice of potency.

16. The finer indications for treatment, as opposed to gross generalities, will determine remedy potentiation. The finer the characteristics in total symptomatology, the higher the potential energy demanded. Hence the high potency.

Eugene Underhill