HEPAR SULPHURIS CALCAREUM


The summing up of these four characteristics, namely, extreme sensitiveness to pain and touch, extreme weakness in general, and in particular parts, and the sticking pains, make this remedy out alone in the field to tissue destroyers. No other remedy has these symptoms all combined.


This remedy was first prepared and introduced to the homoeopathic profession by Hahnemann. It is a chemical entity or compound, and not a mixture of Sulphur and Calcarea; it exhibits some of the chief characteristics of both these powerful drugs, and is, therefore, worthy of study.

It resembles Sulphur in its power to produced offensive odors, discharges, and filthy-looking lesions, and Calcarea in the tendency to produce easy and excessive perspirations, and its deep-seated action upon all the tissues.

Add to the above its individual extreme sensitiveness to cold, and drafts of air, and to pain and touch, and we have indeed an outstanding remedy. It tends to produce suppurations, which is generally of a superficial nature.

Now we have other remedies which produce suppuration, excessive perspiration, foul discharges, and which attack and destroy tissue; therefore, let us examine the characteristic symptoms which will differentiate this drug from all others.

First then, we have the extreme sensitiveness to cold air and drafts of air. This is so marked that even on a hot summer day the patient needing this remedy will place himself beside a hot stove and still feel cold. The proximity to the stove may cause him to sweat profusely, and this sweat is frequently of a vile odor, or it may be induced by the exertions he has made to reach the stove; nevertheless he remains cold.

This state of coldness is so much aggravated by any draft of air that should any one open the door, and be too slow in closing it, he is filled with a violent surge of anger against that offender (and I mean violent). The offense needs to be repeated but once or twice and so great is his anger that the could at that moment inflict severe bodily harm or even murder. This rage rushed upon him like a tornado and leaves almost as quickly, but is succeeded by a morose silent mood which is as easily fanned to fever heat again.

Secondly: This patient is sensitive beyond any ordinary degree to pain, and resists to the best of his power the kindly attentions of the doctor, nurse, or parent, aimed at giving him relief. It is a real task to attend to a dressing in a case which needs Hepar sulphur.

Thirdly: These patients who sweat so profusely, who are so cold, and so vehement at times, must of necessity, be weak physically; any slight exertion tires them out.

Fourthly: The pains wherever felt are generally described as sticking in character. The inflamed ear, abscess, throat etc., all have these sticking pains.

The summing up of these four characteristics, namely, extreme sensitiveness to pain and touch, extreme weakness in general, and in particular parts, and the sticking pains, make this remedy out alone in the field to tissue destroyers. No other remedy has these symptoms all combined.

Mentally, the patient needing this remedy is irritable, impatient, easily angered to an extreme degree, or is morose, saddened, remembering unpleasant happenings, sits by himself, dislikes company, and broods on his misfortunes. HEAD:Stitching pains; pains as from a boil; as from a nail in the brain on one side; eczema capitis with great sensitiveness to touch, and foul discharge.

EYES: Conjunctivitis; redness of the lids; lids agglutinated; ulcerations of the lid margins and of the cornea, with extreme sensitiveness and lachrymation, scrofulous appearance.

EAR: Suppuration of the middle ear; violent pains, recurrent; boils in the external auditory canal; sticking pains.

MOUTH: Looseness of the teeth; gum boils; sensitive; salivation with an offensive odor.

THROAT: A sensation of splinter or fish bone in the throat with pain into the ear on the affected side when swallowing quinsy; fearful of choking; laryngitis; croup with loose rattling cough and easy sweating.

STOMACH: Craving for sour things, especially vinegar.

ABDOMEN: Weakness of the bowels; difficult hard or soft stool.

BLADDER: Inflammation of, with slow discharge of urine; no power to expel the urine in a stream. Pyelitis with chills; sensitiveness to cold and drafts.

LUNGS: Weakness; voice weak; sticking pains in the chest; loose rattling croupy cough with greenish mattery expectoration; empyema.

GLANDS AND SKIN: Suppuration of the axillary and cervical glands with extreme sensitiveness; suppurations following slightest injury or abrasions; eczematous patches with moisture of a foul odor in chilly patients.

As will be seen by the above brief resume the tendency to suppuration affects the mucous membrane, skin and glands, much more so than it does the bones. It would be a grand remedy for scurvy.

Kenneth A Mclaren