ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS IN DECEMBER ISSUE


The so-called characteristic symptoms are based upon individuality, that is to say, they are the peculiar or unusual symptoms that by themselves or by their close relationship to other symptoms form a symptom-picture that differs from every other symptom-picture in the materia medica. This is more striking the better the remedy is proved and the greater has been its clinical use.


Will someone who knew Kent intimately kindly tell us how much practice in acute cases he had, or whether his work was chiefly chronic consultations?.

-I knew Kent intimately for several years, in fact lived in his home for many months. He did a general as well as a consultation practice at that time, so his work was in both the acute and chronic fields of practice.-C.L. OLDS.

What did Kent think of J.H.Allens views, theses and prescribing for the chronic miasms? What was H.C. Allens opinion?.

-I should hate to be quoted as to my views on Kents … views of someone elses views. It might be like the version of Shakespeare that was translated from the English into the French, and then the French back into the English again. Kents views on almost every subject having relation to homoeopathy, may be found in his published writings.-C.L.OLDS.

Where can one find in the repertory the following questions, which came up in one of my cases?.

Involuntary urination while vomiting.

Pain in the head alternating with rheumatism of the extremities.

Always feels better both physically and mentally during menses.

Palpitation on eating. Has to stop eating if palpitations become too strong.

Angina and pain in the throat immediately after menses.

-[a] In Repertory of the Urinary Organs by Morgan is the following: Micturition, during, vomiting: Canth., Merc.s., Par. brav. By inference this means involuntary urination, as it would hardly be voluntary under such circumstances. Compare also the rubrics under Involuntary urination while coughing, sneezing and blowing the nose. The forces are similar.

[b] Pain in head alternating with rheumatism of the extremities. As I do not find that symptom in any repertory, I would suggest the rubric Pains changing location.

[c] Always feels much better both physically and mentally during menses: Lach., Zinc.

[d] Palpitation on eating. Has to stop eating if palpitation becomes too strong. Vide Kent p.863, Palpitation of heart after eating.

[e] Angina and pain in the throat immediately after menses. I had one patient who months after month had this post-menstrual sore throat, but I was never able to find the symptom in repertories. I hope that someone will have found it and will publish it, for it seems to be a very unusual and peculiar symptom. Where a symptom like the above cannot be found in the repertory I work it out like this: Make two rubrics of “pain in the throat” and “worse after menses” and eliminate in the usual way. This is “beating the devil about the bush”, not from choice but from necessity.-C.L.OLDS.

-“Involuntary urination while vomiting”, p.640, Kents Repertory, 1897 edition, under “Involuntary urination with vomiting”, Crot. hor.

“Pain in head alternating with rheumatism of extremities”. P.141, under “Pain in head alternating with pain in joints”, Sulphur.

“Amelioration of all complaints during menses”. p.704, Lachesis, Zinc.

“Palpitation on eating. Has to stop eating if palpitation becomes too strong”, p.848 under “Palpitation during dinner”, Calc., China, Crot. tig., Hepar, Ignatia, Phos., Pulsatilla, Silicea, Stramonium, Sulphur-S.P. ROBERTS.

Where can one read in all scientific clarity observations on provings? On what are the so-called characteristic symptoms based?.

-One can read in all scientific clarity observations on proving in the Organon n.105-145. Also in Kents Lectures on Homoeopathic Philosophy p.211 et seq.

The so-called characteristic symptoms are based upon individuality, that is to say, they are the peculiar or unusual symptoms that by themselves or by their close relationship to other symptoms form a symptom-picture that differs from every other symptom-picture in the materia medica. This is more striking the better the remedy is proved and the greater has been its clinical use.

How do we know one friend from another? Not by the fact that he is a man and has hair on his head and eyes in his face, or that he laughs and smiles and talks. These things are common to all men. But it is because he has certain peculiarities, oddities and rarities, both physical and mental, that characterize and individualize him as different from all others. So it is with our remedies; they are just as individual as are we. Let us take for example a few of the symptoms of Kali bi. that give it character. Everywhere the mucous membranes may produce a tough, sticky, yellowish discharge that can be drawn out into long strings or ropes.

Everywhere these same membranes may ulcerate, giving rise to ulcers having punched-out appearance and with a tendency to perforate. The formation of elastic plugs of mucus or clinkers in the nose with pain at the root of that member. Pain as of a load or weight in the stomach immediately after eating, and often extending to the back. Pain in small spots in different parts. The formation of false membranes, as in croup or diphtheria with a hoarse, metallic cough. Tongue mapped, or red, dry and shining as if varnished. Cough with pain from midsternum to back. Weak heart which feels cold.

These few symptoms aid in forming a picture of Kali bi. They are some of the important characteristic symptoms that make it different from any other remedy in the materia medica.- C.L.OLDS.

What remedy do you advise, in what dosage and under what conditions to be able to make a proving on ones self to be certain of obtaining a result?.

-Scopalamine hydrobromide 3rd. to 6th. cent. any size dosage at two-hour intervals. Action guaranteed with almost any conditions within a week or ten days.-R.E.S. Hayes.

-Take one tablet of Glonoin 2x every 15 minutes until satisfied that you are producing symptoms. Then stop, or take Lac. can. 200 every 2 hours until symptoms appear.-C.L. OLDS.

-Try Glonoin in low potency, repeated doses, until effect is produced.-J.W. WAFFENSMITH.

What are the most frequently needed remedies for bichromate of potassium injections?.

-The greatest lesson we homoeopaths have yet to learn is.

-that THE INDICATED REMEDY is paramount to all temporary expedients. We have thoroughly tried both methods. In the vent of NO OTHER remedy being indicated, we should be inclined to think of Kali bichromicum high, or perhaps Hydrastis. In all cases, if the individual is properly prescribed for, barring impending fatal poisonings, the effects of the drug used will soon pass away leaving no after effects, for the effects of the drug are artificial.-A.PULFORD.

Why should the most valuable symptoms of a proving be those that appear last, that is at the end of a proving? Why should any symptom of a remedy, in reference to time sequence, be more important than any other symptom?.

-More characteristic of the deeper nature of the patient, the keystone, and a sure direct symptom of the remedy. If the time of aggravation is meant because different forces operate at different times of the day. And as the remedy is itself a force it is necessary that that force be met by its equal force, thus the two become the most important factors. It is absolutely necessary that ALL our remedies be proven and registered on SUN TIME that there may be no conflict with those already proven.

If the time elapsing is meant instead of the time of aggravation, then it is because the conditions are more fully developed, therefore more expressive of the real action of the remedy.-A. PULFORD.

-The most valuable symptoms in a proving are always the last to appear. This is undoubtedly because there are the finer distinctions of the remedy in its reaction to the vital energy; whereas the more crude reactions are less dynamic, having less effect on the vital energy, and thus appear first, possibly as a sort of irritant instead of expressing the real dynamic action.- H.A. ROBERTS.

What is the basis of complementary relationship of remedies and how may it be practised by the prescriber without merely submitting to the authority of tables, or how may it be practised when the tables do not supply the desired relationship?.

-If homoeopathy were completed, complementary remedies would not be needed. They are only needed to complete, if possible, the cure of a case for which we can find no specifically indicated remedy. It is no credit to us or to our art to have to resort to this method, for it can not be practised intelligently nor scientifically, it must be practised empirically which is entirely un-homoeopathic, for there is always in such cases something present of which we have no knowledge. No remedy, complementary or otherwise, should be given on any other ground than on its specific indications. Every remedy, like every individual,has its own individuality and in every instance will carry the case through to a successful termination without the aid of any other remedy, if that remedy is specifically indicated. This we can not ignore. Whether complementary or antidotal the remedy should only be prescribed on its own individuality. If this were not true NO REMEDY would ever complete a cure alone.-A. PULFORD.

-The relation of the complementary remedies is on the basis of their similarity. Those remedies having the most in common are almost always complementary, like Allium cepa and Pulsatilla; Puls. and Kali sulph.; Puls. and Sil., etc. This is in contrast to the antagonistic remedies, like Rhus and Apis, which have practically nothing in common, and therefore are incompatible. There are many tables of authority for complementary remedies which can be used as one would use a repertory; but if one bears in mind the similarity of symptomatology as a basis for complementary support, it will lead one naturally to the desired sequence.-H.A. ROBERTS.

Allan D. Sutherland