EDITORIAL


EDITORIAL. There are many ways in which Homoeopathy could be provided in insurance contracts over and above the manner in which it is done at the present time in the plans actually in operation. Our insurance in crystallizing and promoting this new expression of homoeopathic practice.


CAN HOMOEOPATHY BE EXPANDED?.

Unwilling as we are to face the facts, when the facts dont look enticing, we, as homoeopaths, are, nevertheless, confronted with a serious situation in these United States. Our good and stalwart homoeopaths are getting scarcer every year and the new blood to replace them is not even a trickle. it is the duty of every member of our organization and homoeopaths at heart to squeeze his brains and suggest some practical, effective solution to this problem. Last year I put the whole matter before our readers asking for suggestions, discussion, any mark of interest or concern but nobody said a word-rather discouraging! We have to keep hammering to drive the nail in and here is another angle worth considering:

One of my patients, a distinguished insurance consultant, and one of the pioneers of prepaid medical insurance plans in California, has some ideas and even a plan, which should and could be started on a small scale.

We do not realize that, unknown to most of us, there has been a tremendously increased participation of employees and their dependents in prepaid insurance programs-either under- written by insurance companies or provided by service organizations such as California Physicians Service. This increase is due, to a great extent, to contracts negotiated by unions with employers under which the employers assume all or most of the cost of such insurance programs or service plans.

Now, how could such a program help Homoeopathy?.

First, by providing new means of homoeopathic education of the public which would result in greater demand for homoeopathic therapy. This factor is of basic importance. Laymens leagues over the country and our patients, too, are doing a lot of this work, when the doctor takes the time to enlighten them on what Homoeopathy is.

Second, it is unethical for the physician to advertise directly to the public; however, nobody can stop insurance companies from doing the advertising for this branch of therapy.

Third, this plan might also be a way of prompting medical students to consider the advantages of specializing in Homoeopathy. Group insurance plans are developed with a view to providing reimbursement for the cost of the various specialties in medicine including consultant fees, x-rays, special nursing, etc. This point is particularly essential: the trend of the medical student nowadays is to specialize right away, as the fees of the specialist are much higher and very tempting to the young doctor who has to pay his debts and start a family after long years of expensive training.

So what we have to do now, is to support Dr. kent Smiths efforts to integrate our group wit the American Medical Association as a therapeutic specialty.

There are many ways in which Homoeopathy could be provided in insurance contracts over and above the manner in which it is done at the present time in the plans actually in operation. Our insurance in crystallizing and promoting this new expression of homoeopathic practice.

It is a painful fact that physicians are not, primarily, interested in the social aspects of medical care; they are too busy performing their job. However, insurance plans are the coming thing. We had better propose our own, now, rather than to accept, later, one similar to the British health program!.

Now, what do YOU think of these ideas? Please write your comments to our President. Dr. W.K. Bond, Greensfork, Indiana, or to me at 450 Sutter St., San Francisco 8, California.

Royal E S Hayes