FIRST REMOVE THE CAUSE


FIRST REMOVE THE CAUSE. Your Hahnemannian practitioner should always keep in mind that one of his foremost responsibilities is to seek out and remove the cause-a point stressed by Hahnemann in paragraph 7 of the Organon, wherein he devotes considerable thought to its importance and emphasizes that this must be done specifically and particularly prior to the administration of the similimum.


To a homoeopath, the subject of pediatrics holds more than ordinary amount of interest, because not only are we inordinately successful in the medical treatment of diseases of childhood, but as a medical group, more than any other, have devoted a great deal of time and thought to the influence of heredity and environment, and to many other factors leading to chronicity. We find it hard to believe that eradication of serious disease is to be brought about simply by the treatment of the individual sufferer, but rather to go farther than that and to include his offspring through several generations in order to arrive at a satisfactory result.

Your Hahnemannian practitioner should always keep in mind that one of his foremost responsibilities is to seek out and remove the cause-a point stressed by Hahnemann in paragraph 7 of the Organon, wherein he devotes considerable thought to its importance and emphasizes that this must be done specifically and particularly prior to the administration of the similimum.

Since we have been asked to point up a paper along psychosomatic lines, I wish to emphasize that point of view throughout the rest of this paper. In the minds of most of us, however-partly from habit, partly from habit, partly from previous lack of more fundamental knowledge, maybe carelessness- we have limited our application of this important tenet to a very material, physical cause. We do not pretend this is necessarily a completely new slant to any of you, but sincerely hope it will give us all a point for thought, especially in view of the trend of present-day medical thinking.

The trained homoeopath has from the beginning no doubt felt, as he practiced the principles of homoeopathy laid down in the organon, that no matter what else he may have been doing, he certainly was pioneering in psychosomatic medicine-as partial proof thereof, I only wish to remind you of the importance of the mental symptoms in history taking and in the selecting of remedies.

Now comes the psychiatrist the psychologist and the psycho- analyst who have found, through their methods of approach, how fundamental the teachings of Hahnemann are and have been; and it gives us food for thought and considerable satisfaction to find this confirmation of vital and important homoeopathic principles- in the realm of the mind and its functions-since it is usually more simple to find its substantiation or proof on the material side of our lives.

So the analyst seeks to find “cause”, obtained under questioning and consultative rule, together with the patients recital of various events in his life to date, leading up to a type of confession, or more descriptively spoken of as “catharsis”- a recital either written or spoken. In other words, it gives the patient relief to tell his complete story. What wouldnt we homoeopaths give to find some such simple formula that would so influence our patients recital that he would share that same expected sense of relief.

However, let me assure you that the results are not always obtained as simply and completely as may appear from their writings and reports. You may rest assured that this group of analysts is realizing more and more the need for medical treatment in addition to theirs. It is the writers opinion, based on a reasonable amount of observation through acquaintance and relationships with members of these three professions, that a surprisingly large number of their patients, in spite of having been analyzed, still need homoeopathic treatment.

I would, therefore, at this point like to suggest that we stick to our last, searching for the similimum more earnestly than ever, but emphasizing more and more the importance of our patients mental symptoms, which are to be increasingly valuable, as civilization progresses and our lives become more complicated.

Carl H. Enstam