QUESTION AND ANSWER DEPARTMENT


Patients with the history of severe rheumatic fever, scarlet fever, diphtheria or any other disease causing heart complications through suppressive treatment must be conservatively handled and if there is an actual lesion present the potential for trouble is very great. In heart cases sudden increase or decrease in weight are both dangerous and a sudden stepping up of physical exercise is simply asking for the worst.


Send questions to Dr. Eugene Underhill, Jr., 2010 Chestnut. Street, Philadelphia, Penna.

Question: WHAT IS TO BE UNDERSTOOD BY PATHOLOGICAL PRESCRIBING? Answer: This may be understood as prescribing for some particular disease such as pneumonia, malaria, measles, cancer, etc., or the expression may be employed when too much emphasis is placed upon pathologic or structural changes rather than upon the general and mental symptoms of the individual patient. The end products or results of a disease process are the last and least important factors to be given consideration in selecting the homoeopathic remedy.

Question: WHY SHOULD A DAY OFF FROM WORK BE SO UPSETTING TO MANY PEOPLE?

Answer: Everyone tends to become adjusted (tolerant) to his own routine no matter what that may be. As long as one is young and well a radical departure from the regular schedule will show little effect. With advancing years, increasing pathology and decreasing adaptability, almost any change may prove upsetting or unduly fatiguing. Warning signals of this nature must be heeded and here is where homoeopathic treatment is needed to arouse the constitution. Correct case management will help in holding the ground gained by the remedy.

Question: IS IT NOT TRUE THAT TOO RADICAL A RESTRICTION OF THE DIET MAY PROVE DANGEROUS?

Answer: Yes, often so. It is dangerous to put very fleshy or obese patient on a fast as the sudden dissolving out of stored toxins and other end-products from the tissues may produce an overwhelming toxaemia. Radical weight reduction in cases of damaged heart may prove disastrous, for when all the other tissues become relaxed and flabby the heart itself will do likewise.

Patients with the history of severe rheumatic fever, scarlet fever, diphtheria or any other disease causing heart complications through suppressive treatment must be conservatively handled and if there is an actual lesion present the potential for trouble is very great. In heart cases sudden increase or decrease in weight are both dangerous and a sudden stepping up of physical exercise is simply asking for the worst. The utmost caution and conservation are needed in heart disease. We will never forget the mistake of allowing a man to take a trip to the bathroom with immediately fatal consequences when everything appeared favorable for his recovery had absolute prolonged rest been enjoined.

Eugene Underhill