QUESTION AND ANSWER DEPARTMENT


Fresh, raw, unsweetened fruit juices in season provide the simplest and best laxatives. If the pulp of one or two peaches or plums proves insufficient give more. The same with scraped apple and other fruits. If cereals and so-called infant foods are being given discontinue their use and put the child on the milk and fruit diet.


Question: AT WHAT INTERVALS SHOULD AN INFANT UNDER SIX MONTHS BE FED?.

Answer: Except in special cases we advise four-hour intervals and a total of five feedings in twenty-four hours. A rest period of eight hours without food should be provided at night.

Question: IN THE CASE OF A NURSING INFANT WHEN THE MOTHER APPEARS WELL AND LACTATION NORMAL DO YOU ADVISE ANY SUPPLEMENTAL FOODS AND IF SO, WHAT?.

Answer: Fresh undiluted orange juice should be given every forenoon and scraped apple every afternoon. Only sweet selected fruit should be used for this purpose. The juice of a whole orange or the pulp of a good sized apple is not too much and will be found most beneficial.

Question: HOW MUCH WATER SHOULD A NURSING INFANT BE GIVEN AND DO YOU ADVISE ADDING SUGAR TO THE WATER?.

Answer: Only in rare cases is water required if breast feedings are supplemented by the orange juice and scraped apple. The normal mammary secretion provides both food and drink as nature evidently intended. Plain or sugar water may reduce appetite, create an unnatural thirst and derange digestion.

In case it seems desirable to give the infant water its value can be enhanced by the addition of a teaspoonful of lemon juice, freshly expressed.

Question: IS IT ALWAYS NECESSARY TO BOIL THE WATER USED IN MILK MIXTURES?.

Answer: If the water is from a source known to be pure and free from any possible contamination boiling is entirely unnecessary. If the source is questionable boiling is most certainly advised.

Question: WHAT LAXATIVES DO YOU ADVISE FOR INFANTS?.

Answer: None of the commercial laxatives should be employed.

Fresh, raw, unsweetened fruit juices in season provide the simplest and best laxatives. If the pulp of one or two peaches or plums proves insufficient give more. The same with scraped apple and other fruits. If cereals and so-called infant foods are being given discontinue their use and put the child on the milk and fruit diet.

If the infant is artificially fed and is being given pasteurized, homogenized, condensed, evaporated or dried milk relief from constipation can often be observed by changing to raw, unpasteurized milk. Should there be evidence of a calcium deficiency the use of raw milk is especially important.

Question: HOW DANGEROUS IS RAW MILK IN THE FEEDING OF INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN?.

Answer: The danger is well advertised and greatly over stressed. It is really very slight indeed.

Eugene Underhill