HOMOEOPATHY TODAY


Homoeopathy exists exactly as it did in the past and so will do in the future. A law of nature and its God cannot die. Undoubtedly the number of present adherents to the ministrations of the physician who is also a homoeopath is larger than ever before since homoeopathy began its career under Hahnemann in the year 1780.


CHAPTER XII. OUTLOOK. CONCERNING THE PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE.

Homoeopathy exists exactly as it did in the past and so will do in the future. A law of nature and its God cannot die. Undoubtedly the number of present adherents to the ministrations of the physician who is also a homoeopath is larger than ever before since homoeopathy began its career under Hahnemann in the year 1780.

This monument is erected in the hope that from it, as a center, truth may be spread which will result in the lessening of suffering and the increased usefulness of mankind.-J. B. GREGG CUSTIS, M.D., at the dedication of the Hahnemann Monument, Washington, D.C., June 21, 1900.

The growth of homoeopathy and its practice has been steady. It is true that not always has there been an understanding of the most essential principles of the art, perhaps because its science has not been grasped, but in some measure its basic idea has been utilized, and the scientific results have not failed to appear. In Germany, France, Italy, Scandinavia, England, and the Americas there have continually been nominal exponents at least of the practice, so that travellers have never been stranded in this respect.

Notwithstanding organized prejudice of the old school against the system, and in local instances against individual physicians, laws in favor of the rights of the school have found their way into the statues. Bitter antagonism of former years has gradually given way to tolerance or indifference. It has not been necessary for the lamb to lie down the lion, though it has sometimes happened.

A more agreeable phase of the conditions-inharmonious or otherwise-is the fact that individual practicians of both schools have in many cases felt no rancor, or exhibited none, and have in many instances kept alive a friendliness with corresponding cooperation in work on occasional demand.

As a matter of fact, however, there has been a striking tendency of the old school to ignore and reject at the same time all homoeopathic lore, though the homoeopathist himself has had to acquire much of the old school point of view, or at least to respect that viewpoint while rejecting it for his own having the homoeopathic background. Hence, the two schools are importantly distinct, actual agreement being out of the question, except in case the homoeopath become neutral and relinquish his distinctive art and ethics.

The two schools are now no nearer together in their view and practice than they were in Hahnemanns day. Indeed in many ways they are much farther apart. Time has extended the realization and efficacy of the law by which internal remedies are prepared and so obtain their power and lasting advantage in wider spheres than in earlier years. This advance in itself though crudely imitated has not lessened the opposition.

To mention some of the striking differences, we may cite : (a) the reason for any homoeopathic prescription is to give the patient reactive power to resist the malady instead of combat it ; (b) the selection of the proper remedy on the basis of the individual patient, and not for his disease alone ; (c) one remedy at a time, and not a compound or mixed prescription ; (d) one administration to suffice as long as improvement continues, instead of seeking the point of saturation of the system with a drug ; (e) avoidance of foods that contain known drug principles ; (f) proper consideration of the environment, to promote comfort of body and mind.

The Organon itself has the unique distinction of perennial vitality. It is published in all languages, and though five editions were issued by Hahnemann, the essential fundamental root Principles of Homoeopathy are found in the first almost as perfectly and positively stated as in the sixth. It seems then that the Organon, like Minerva from the brain of Jupiter, came forth practically perfect as a guide to the theory and practice of homoeopathy. WILLIAM BOERICKE, M.D.

Here is reproduced what one of the consistent students and practitioners has to say on Hahnemann, his Organon, and medicine:.

Hahnemann was a student of medicine, even when he had not patients to practice on. In 1784, five years after his graduation, he taught surgery for surgeons, not for barbers, shepherds and executioners. He taught hygiene, fresh air, exercise, diversion, baths hot and cold, sixty years before the first bathtub appeared in America. Professor Baldinger, of Jena and Gottingen, in 1785,recommended Hahnemanns teaching as being “better than those give up to that time”.

John Hutchinson