SOME CANCER CASES


Unfortunately, my case records are not now available so that I cannot say what remedies were given, but in the course of two or three years constitutional treatment the leukoplakia disappeared, to be replaced temporarily by a form of dyspepsia which in turn yielded to the attack of the indicated remedy.


One corner of my consulting room is screened off to form a dressing room for patients. The screen is a four-leaved one with heavy wooden frame, and the leaves are covered with ornate embossed paper. That screen has a history. Some seventeen or eighteen years ago a patient, Miss C.R., age 36, came to consult me about her tongue. She had been treated first by her family doctor, then sent into hospital where various methods had been tried, including x-ray. Finally she was told that they “could do no more for her”, and was discharged with the prospect of lingering and painful end. Her tongue had thick whitish patches on it and was very sensitive to salt, sugar, heat, cold, etc.

The condition was one of leukoplakia and, from the fact that x-ray treatment had been given in the hospital, it was evidently regarded as at least pre-cancerous if not actually malignant. Unfortunately, my case records are not now available so that I cannot say what remedies were given, but in the course of two or three years constitutional treatment the leukoplakia disappeared, to be replaced temporarily by a form of dyspepsia which in turn yielded to the attack of the indicated remedy.

One morning, amongst my letters was one from this woman, who was at that time an office caretaker. By way of expressing her gratitude, she sent me a L5 note and an exceedingly kind letter. The money was allotted to the making of the screen which has been in constant use ever since. This patient was still alive last year, but I have lost sight of her now.

Miss E.S., 62, consulted me in 1927 about a rectal haemorrhage which had occurred in spells for the last 30 years, and was gradually increasing in frequency though the blood was becoming thin and watery. She had refused operation for piles, and had had much arsenic treatment. Sulphur, China, and Nit. ac. effected cessation of the haemorrhage in about two and one-half years, and did not see her from November, 1929, until July, 1932. She then complained of frequent painful micturition though the actual amount of urine was scanty. On test the urine showed a thick cloud of albumin. There was also a mass about the size of a Jaffa orange involving the descending colon; no stool without enema.

The previous remedies did no good and in October, 1932, I gave Carcinosin 200 (1). After ten days improvement set in and continued with occasional help of intercurrent remedies, Merc. cor. or Lyc., till January, 1933, when Carcin. 200 (I) was repeated because the bowels were showing signs of renewed obstruction. May, 1933, repeated Carcin. 200 (I). July, 1933, Carcin. IM. (I). By September the patient was beginning to get up for a while daily, gaining weight in spite of marked ascites. November, 1933, Carcin. IM. (I). December, 1933, Carcin. 10M. (I), after which improvement was much greater. The last time I saw her was July, 1934; she had been out several times then, and I heard later that she was living a fairly normal life, having very little trouble with bowels or urine, though ascites was still present. I heard a few days ago that she is able to do light housework.

Mrs. McK., 38, came in May, 1930, about a “lump” in the right breast. Family doctor had advised immediate operation which she was very unwilling to consider. There was a hard mass in right breast, freely movable, and no enlarged glands. Other symptoms were dyspnoea for many years; weariness generally; weakness of arms; alternating diarrhoea and constipation; depression since the previous autumn. Ars. alb. 30 plus, once daily for seven days, gave three months decided improvement. August, 1930, Ars. 200 plus Id.

C. Gordon