EDITORIAL NOTES AND COMMENTS


The tonsils are much inflamed and swollen, with a purple appearance of the throat. From the nostrils there is a thin, bloody and ichorous discharge. The tongue is dry and cracked, and sordes appear upon the teeth. Altogether the picture of Ailanthus is that of malignancy, hence the remedy should be though of in desperate cases of scarlet- fever, particularly when the throat presents the appearance of diphtheria.


Homoeopathy in Germany.- We have just received information that the universities of Frankfurt and Berlin are to establish chairs in homoeopathy; the Prussian Parliament has recently passed a bill to this effect.

This is astounding new and betokens an entirely new era for homoeopathy in a country, which heretofore has looked upon the homoeopathic method of treatment as pure Kurfuscherei. Unquestionably the research work of Hugo Schulz and of August Bier and the courageous, persistent efforts of the little band of ardent homoeopaths in Germany, have had much to do with this remarkable change of attitude of those in authority.

We Americans may, perhaps, pride ourselves upon our “go-getting” abilities, but with our national vice of superficiality, we have very much to learn from our thorough, painstaking, persistent German friends who go to the bottom of things, no matter what the effort may cost. All hail, then, to the dawn of the golden age of homoeopathy in the land of its birth and early travail!.

Useful Remedies in Scarlet Fever.- Belladonna, of course, comes to mind at once, as typical remedy in the smooth, scarlet red eruption of this disease. The patient is likely to be of the plethoric, robust type, in whom symptoms come on suddenly and with turbulent violence; delirium may be a factor and is characterized by much activity, during which the patient attempts to get out of bed, to escape, or makes noisy demonstrations.

The face is decidedly flushed, the eyes brilliant, with dilated pupils, the throat is sore, more often on the right side, with a sensation of a lump in the throat, over which the sufferer must frequently swallow. Dryness of the throat and thirst are characteristic, as is the well-known strawberry tongue, red papillae projecting above a thickly-coated, yellowish or yellowish-white coating.

The pulse is full and round, often bounding and in the neck a pulsating of the vessels may be seen. Headache is of the congestive type, throbbing, worse from motion. A symptom of importance is sleepiness, with inability to sleep.

Ailanthus glandulosa, known as the Tree of Heaven plays a valuable part in the therapy of scarlet-fever, when this is of the adynamic type. The patient is greatly prostrated, dull, stupid and delirious; the rash is mottled, purplish in appearance and is slow in coming out. The cellular tissues of the neck and under the jaw are sensitive and swollen; the parotids are likewise enlarged; the head feels full and is burning hot; pulse is small and rapid; delirium is of the muttering type or the patient may even be unconscious.

The tonsils are much inflamed and swollen, with a purple appearance of the throat. From the nostrils there is a thin, bloody and ichorous discharge. The tongue is dry and cracked, and sordes appear upon the teeth. Altogether the picture of Ailanthus is that of malignancy, hence the remedy should be though of in desperate cases of scarlet- fever, particularly when the throat presents the appearance of diphtheria. Certain it is, that the remedy cannot be mistaken for Belladonna.

Arum triphyllum, Jack in the Pulpit, may at times be needed. Restlessness and irritability are marked, excoriating discharges from the nose are very characteristic, the lips and nostrils are sore, even ulcerated and in spite of the pain, the child picks the ulcerated spots until they bleed; the mouth and throat are raw and sore, the mucous membrane bleeds, the larynx may be inflamed and if so, aphonia with uncontrollable voice will be present.

Desquamation of the skin is in large flakes and may recur several times. The urine is scanty or suppressed and the child is dull and apathetic. The constant picking at the nose and lips is perhaps the most striking symptoms and must not be confounded with a somewhat similar symptom, probably of different origin, found in Cina.

Ammonium carb. should be thought of when the eruption “strikes in” and cerebral paralysis threatens. Cramps and epistaxis will be present, heart weakness is pronounced, with feeble rapid pulse; the breathing may be stertorous, the skin is cyanotic and the rash miliary in character. Stoppage of the nose is pronounced and distressing. The picture of Ammonium carb. is that of a decidedly desperate case.

Hydrocyanic acid is another remedy likely to be called for in desperate cases. Stauffer, in his wonderfully complete “Homootherapie”speaks of it as serviceable when a blue exanthematous and cramps are present. The Guiding Symptoms of Hering mention “scarletina, when the eruption in its early appearance is dark colored and soon becomes livid, only slowly regaining its color when this is expelled by pressure of finger; rapid, feeble pulse; coma and great prostration.” Convulsions and the symptom, fluids enter stomach with a gurgling noise, are characteristic. Opium may be valuable when coma, stertorous breathing, hot sweat, dusky countenance, contracted pupils and uraemia are present.

Allan D. Sutherland
Dr. Sutherland graduated from the Hahnemann Medical College in Philadelphia and was editor of the Homeopathic Recorder and the Journal of the American Institute of Homeopathy.
Allan D. Sutherland was born in Northfield, Vermont in 1897, delivered by the local homeopathic physician. The son of a Canadian Episcopalian minister, his father had arrived there to lead the local parish five years earlier and met his mother, who was the daughter of the president of the University of Norwich. Four years after Allan’s birth, ministerial work lead the family first to North Carolina and then to Connecticut a few years afterward.
Starting in 1920, Sutherland began his premedical studies and a year later, he began his medical education at Hahnemann Medical School in Philadelphia.
Sutherland graduated in 1925 and went on to intern at both Children’s Homeopathic Hospital and St. Luke’s Homeopathic Hospital. He then was appointed the chief resident at Children’s. With the conclusion of his residency and 2 years of clinical experience under his belt, Sutherland opened his own practice in Philadelphia while retaining a position at Children’s in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department.
In 1928, Sutherland decided to set up practice in Brattleboro.