PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS


Strangely enough the homoeopathic physician is often accused by his allopathic critic in his ignorance of Homoeopathy, of merely treating symptoms, whereas it is the critic himself who practices this superficial medicine. The homoeopathic physician, on the other hand, treats his patient as a whole through his symptoms and their modifications through changes in the environment, which is quite a different matter.


MEDICINE IN THE TWO ELIZABETHAN ERAS:

THE ROLE OF HOMOEOPATHY IN THE SECOND

Such a system of medicine must recognize that it is as much an art as a science, and that healing is a relationship between two living personalities. It must recognize too, that the sick individual has to take an active part in his treatment and not be merely the passive recipient of this or that treatment. For just as it is rightly said that man does not live by alone, so should it be emphasized that man cannot be cured by medicine alone. He must see to it himself that he lives as far as possible a physically and psychically healthy life. Indeed, each individual has a power within himself to help in his own cure.

Do the official schools of medicine teach such an art today? I am afraid not: they are so intent on seeking the specific treatment for this or that named disease or the antibiotic that will most effectively put out of action the organism regarded as the cause of the disease, that they are losing sight of the individual himself.

But Homoeopathy in its persistent search for the reactions of the individual to his environment in the broadest sense, no matter of what the patient is complaining surely fulfills these requirements, especially when it is recognized that the homoeopathic potencies do not anything to the patient as do the drugs of the dominant school, but rather stimulate the patients own recuperative powers to overcome the infection or re – establish the normal metabolism which has become deranged by the illness.

When you consider how the homoeopathic physician diagnoses the individuality of his patient over and above the name of the disease from which he is suffering, and uses for the purpose of his prescription rather than the name of the disease this personal diagnosis of the patients mental and emotional reactions, his responses to changes in weather conditions, the alternations in his environment which influence his symptoms, etc., one realize how very individualistic is the Homoeopathic prescription fitted to that particular patient.

The homoeopathic physician does not seek for a remedy specific to any named disease and which he can thus apply almost automatically once he has made his organic diagnosis, which in quite an appreciable number of instances may ultimately be found to be wrong and so the treatment based upon it must therefore have been wrong. He does not, as is so often done, merely suppress the most outstanding symptom by an appropriate drug; for example giving an anodyne to mask the pain or removing the skin eruption by some strong local application, in other words putting the dust under the mat and pretending the room is clean.

Strangely enough the homoeopathic physician is often accused by his allopathic critic in his ignorance of Homoeopathy, of merely treating symptoms, whereas it is the critic himself who practices this superficial medicine. The homoeopathic physician, on the other hand, treats his patient as a whole through his symptoms and their modifications through changes in the environment, which is quite a different matter.

Homoeopathic therapy, unlike methods of treatment, is based on a natural law “Similia Similibus Curentur” “Likes may be cured by likes” which has been proved time and time again by experiment and which anyone with the will to do may prove for himself. It is not subject to constant change brought about by this or that latest discovery, and which itself will soon have to give way to the still later idea.

Having now introduced to you our actor, what of the scene in which he is to play his role?

This is the nineteen hundred and fifty – fourth year of the Christian era and the second year of the reign of our much loved and admired young Queen Elizabeth II, who will remember while in south Africa on her twenty – first birthday, before she had any idea that she would so soon be called to such an exalted position as she holds today, broadcast to the commonwealth and Empire her resolve to dedicate her life to the service of this grand community which dedication she recently repeated at her Coronation.

Alva Benjamin