Homoeopathy – Law of Similars


Homoeopathy has its limitations, it is true, but this system is par-excellence in relieving illness. The Physician being broad- minded, will use any adjuvental measures that will aid in restoring health to his patients. The upset in the world structure as of today makes it doubly difficult to educate the people to anything so diametrically different from the so-called allopathic system as the law of similars.


We need two more colleges to teach Homoeopathy, one in the central west and another on the Pacific coast. If we can not have these two extra colleges, then we should work for a department of Homoeopathy in two or more of our university medical schools. These departments should be filled by men whose knowledge of Homoeopathy, and ability to teach same, should be of the highest, character. I believe this would be the means of disseminating the values of the law of similars to a greater degree than any previous effort, chiefly for the simple reason, that prejudice would be lessened in the dominant school.

I feel quite safe in saying that any Homoeopathic physician who has applied himself to the study and practice of the law of similars for some years, can impart to students of medicine the foundation upon which he or she may build the most useful life for the aid of suffering humanity. The virtue of the law of similars is as true and unfailing as all natural laws; they do not vary, but they must be unerringly applied, and this means knowledge of the highest sort.

When we are familiar with one of natures laws, especially the law of similars in therapeutic as exemplified by the teaching of Samuel Hahnemann, which bodies so much good for the human family, we are very remiss if we do not apply this great truth, and it seems to me, that the chief reason for not applying this benevolent law is lack of knowledge in its adaptation to the ills of mankind.

There is no greater achievement than to pass on to future generations scientific truth, and especially, when that truth holds such a measure of beneficent aid to the human family, as is found in the law of similars. Doctor Krauss said that those who doubt this law do not doubt, for they do not know what they doubt. Criticism of something, of which you have no knowledge, prejudice, which means pre-judging, added to doubt, are probably the foremost shortcomings of mankind.

If we are completely familiar with a scientific truth such as the law of similars, no one is going to change your mind any more than you could be convinced that the sun rise in the west. Doctor Krauss, further says, Hippocrates the observer, introduced the art of clinical observation as the basis for pathologic diagnosis. Galen, the disseminator, spread with powerful authority the teachings of Hippocrates over the medical world. Paracelsus, the assailer, introduced chemical as well as physical analysis into the practice of medicine.

Hahnemann, the experimenter, discovered the symptomatic source of both pathologic and therapeutic diagnosis and thereby made the practice of medicine scientific. With an array of facts such as these, is it not important that those of us who know something of the superior curative values of Homoeopathy, do all we can to disseminate this great natural law for the benefit of all mankind?.

You have heard it said that Homoeopathy may given relief, but the action is slow. This is not so. We hear patients tell us that they never had medicine act so promptly, adding “that must be very powerful medicine, Doctor.” If you use the true simile, and the higher potencies, you will see many very prompt results. The true Bryonia headache will often be relieved within the hour with the two hundred potency.

I wonder how many know that scientific medicine began with the studies and experiments of Samuel Hahnemann? Previous to this monumental work, the treatment of the ill was chaotic, to say the least. Hahnemann did not experiment in a half-hearted way. He took four drachms of china twice daily; the result was symptoms akin to malaria fever. What do you think of a mind that could take this risk for humanity? We have had notable examples of other scientists who have risked health and life in experiments to save the lives of their fellowmen, and are still doing it; but Hahnemann was a pioneer in this noble work.

He must have had a vision of one of natures laws and wished to uncover that law and we now he did just that. Hahnemann was ridiculed, and legislated against for his bravery and honesty in discovering this great law, but the law stands for all time, as do all the laws of nature. All that is needed is the intelligent application of this law to more and more people who are suffering from so-called natural disease, to fully reap the great benefits of his scientific discovery.

Homoeopathy has its limitations, it is true, but this system is par-excellence in relieving illness. The Physician being broad- minded, will use any adjuvental measures that will aid in restoring health to his patients. The upset in the world structure as of today makes it doubly difficult to educate the people to anything so diametrically different from the so-called allopathic system as the law of similars. The new chemotherapy of today is another handicap to progress in the dissemination of Homoeopathy.

When normal times return again, there ought to be a splendid opportunity to spread the knowledge of the superior values of the law of similars among the young men and women who have served their country and noted the shortcomings of regular medicine in medical diseases. Without faith you fail in any and all human endeavor.

When we note the small number of students studying Homoeopathy today as compared with those studying the law of similars some years ago, and only two colleges as compared with a dozen or more, we are apt to come to the conclusion that Homoeopathy is on the way out. This is not so. A great truth never goes down and out. It may be dormant perhaps for a time for lack of its application, but as sure as the sun to rise again.

Hahnemann;s closing paragraph in the preface of his sixth edition of the Organon is a fitting ending to this brief essay: “Thus Homoeopathy is a perfectly simple system of medicine, remaining always fixed in its principles as in practice which, like the doctrine whereon it is based, if rightly apprehended, will be found to be complete (and therefore serviceable). What is clearly pure in doctrine and practice should be self-evident, and all backward sliding to the pernicious routinism of the old school that is as much its antithesis as night is to day, should cease to vaunt itself with the honorable name of Homoeopathy.

N C Das