First Aid In Air Raid


Speaking of the deadly peril from shattered glass: some of us realize that, in the Great War, when air raid victims were carried into our hospital from a nearby street. No one who saw the dead in our mortuary failed to recognize that London was not built for air raids. One saw the broken, twisted limbs with bits of jagged glass sticking out of their, wounds:-the pretty girl, her face a mere mask, because the back of her head had been neatly cut off–by glass.


Accidents, Bruises and Shock :.

Cases of accidents, bruising or shock will have the effects minimized, and the recovery accelerated, by the administration of Arnica 200, one dose every 2 hours for 6 doses.

Punctured Wounds :.

Where small splinters have penetrated the skin there is great danger from infection. This will, to a large extent, be obviated by giving Ledum 200, one dose every 2 hours for 3 doses.

Injuries to nerves :.

Injury to sensitive nerve tissue is extremely painful, and the pain can be greatly reduced by giving Hypericum 200, one dose every 2 hours for 3 doses.

Burns :.

In addition to general measures for the treatment of burns, a very soothing application which minimizes sepsis and promotes healing is Urtica urens tincture, one teaspoonful to one pint of water, applied as a wet dressing. In addition, Urtica urens 30, one dose every hour for 6 doses, reduces shock and pain.

Anxiety and fear :.

For the anxiety and fear commonly felt during an air raid Aconite 200, one dose every hour for 3 doses, will be found to steady the nerves without producing any depressing effects.

Hysteria:.

In cases of hysteria and excitement, with a tendency towards weeping or undue emotion, Ignatia 200, one dose every half-hour for 6 doses, will be found to have marked controlling properties.

Dressing for wounds :.

I all cases of wounds, Calendula tincture, one teaspoonful to one pint of water, makes an excellent preparation for clean- sing the wound and for applying as a wet dressing. Not only has it definite antiseptic properties but it is also extremely soothing in its effects.

–The Homoeopathic Recorder,.

Vol. LVII.,–No. 7.

AIR RAID PRECAUTIONS AND HINTS.

We are asked to repeat, and amplify: but must preface our precautions with those of Isaiah, whose message is strikingly opposite to those at home in our black-out of shrinking expectation.

“Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee; hide thyself, as it were for a little moment, until the indignation be overpast.”.

“For the Lord cometh out of His place to punish the inhabitants of the earth for their iniquity

Think ! during an air battle the great and wide danger is not from gas bombs, or incendiary bombs, or explosive bombs, however terrible–where they strike. Gas masks make people happier-safer in the streets–should their bomb happen to be gas. Incendiary bombs we are combating after a some-what peculiar fashion, where we put up protective covering and partitions of inflammable materials, to serve as kindling for structures not particularly vulnerable.

But the great, and far wider danger is from violently hurled jagged plate-glass splinters, and from the overhead artillery of friend and foe a like; because in open places we are in equal danger from our own fighters as from the enemy, when bullets and shrapnel, etc., return to earth from great heights, with gathering momentum. From this danger, roofs walls, even doors may be sufficient protection or the tin hat for those on duty in the streets.

But for the population, generally, the precautions of Isaiah come into force,–“Enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee, and hide ” Did the prophet envisage even the black-out, where we hide against the “terror that flieth by night”?.

Speaking of the deadly peril from shattered glass: some of us realize that, in the Great War, when air raid victims were carried into our hospital from a nearby street. No one who saw the dead in our mortuary failed to recognize that London was not built for air raids. One saw the broken, twisted limbs with bits of jagged glass sticking out of their, wounds:-the pretty girl, her face a mere mask, because the back of her head had been neatly cut off–by glass. Had these foolish persons only retired into their hotel, half a dozen steps away, they need not have been slaughtered.

And, while were on the subject: sandbags filled with sand can stop bullets: we had such bullets sent back again and again by the grateful soldier who had searched for it in the sandbag that had saved his life. But where bags are filled with shingle or stones, these are capable of making deadly missiles, when sent violently flying: as bad as the chunks of rock, so fatal to our soldiers positioned on rocky ground, with no sandbags available. We still have the letters of thanks that exemplify these things.

ACONITE.

Sudden fright.

Anguish: restlessness.

Fear at night.

Fear to go where there is excitement or many people.

Anxiety felt in the region of heart.

Sleepless from fright.

ARSENICUM.

Fear; anxiety; fearful restlessness.

Case:-After an air raid in the war, a frantic patient: “Where could she go? What could she do? If she stayed here, they might come again. If she went into the country they might come there !” Arsenicum gave immediate calm, and she was no more troubled.

ARGENTUM NIT.

Anticipation; internal trembling.Apprehension disorders the stomach. Diarrhoea from apprehension (Gels.). HURRY.

GELSEMIUM.

Great lack of courage. TREMBLING. Diarrhoea from anticipation (Arg. nit).

IGNATIA.

May act as a charm; especially where there is grief and sighing.

OPIUM.

Invaluable for bad effects of fear; fright: apprehension of approaching death.

A goitre patient, a Great War air raid victim, whose house had been wrecked and fired by a bomb, she pinned down under a beam to be burnt alive, appeared recently for “nerves.” She lay awake at night, listening for “them.” She got Opium in high potency, and soon returned to say that she had lost her fear, and was again sleeping. Specific for past frights that recur. HELLEBORUS. Cured case of shock from blow on head. Arn. had failed : patient drowsy : answered slowly as if half comprehending : one pupil larger, one leg dragged : pulse not 50. Patient was worse 4-8 P.M. (all Helleborus).

EXTERNAL REMEDIES.

ARNICA.

Bruises and injuries of soft parts where skin is not broken. (Internally also, for overstrain, physical or mental: tired heart: tired sore muscles.)

HYPERICUM.

Instead of Arnica, where skin is broken or nerves injured with other soft parts. “Nothing equals it in mashed fingers: soothes pain and promotes healing. Follows Arn. in concussion of spine.” We have seen it also promote and modify suppuration.

CALENDULA.

“For torn and ragged wounds, even with loss of substances (Hyper). Removes inflammation and permits local healthy granulation.”

LEDUM.

Especially useful for punctured wounds : tetanus.

Its peculiarity is, relief from cold.

URTICA URENS.

A marvellous remedy for burns of first and second degree. Stops pain instantly; promotes rapid healing.

SYMPHYTUM.

Bone injuries : fractures, internally and externally.

Injuries to periosteum (Ruta) and EYES.

INTERNALLY :

A few granules, dry on tongue : or dissolved in enough water for several two hourly sips.

EXTERNALLY :

Three or four drops of tincture in water, to moisten lint or gauze : cover with oiled silk or wool. Renew when dry.

N C Bose