Editorial


Government expect that in their own interest and in the interest of the Faculty the Kavirajes will renew their registration on payment of the prescribed fee within the extended period. Otherwise they will cease to be regarded as registered Kavirajes, lose their franchise and will not be able to participate in the next general election to the Ayurvedic Council.


AYURVEDA VINDICATES.

A Press Note issued by the Government of Bengal on July 3, states :.

It has been brought to the notice of Government that most of the Ayurvedic practitioners who were registered with the General Council and State Faculty of Ayurvedic Medicine, Bengal, and who were due to have their registration renewed by the 14th April 1942, on payment of a fee of Rs. 5/- each have failed to renew their registration by the prescribed date.

Owing to the present emergency quite a large number of these practitioners had left the place where they had been practising while others failed to pay the renewal fees in time owing to temporary pecuniary difficulties. The Government of Bengal have therefore, extended the time for renewal of registration of these Kavirajes by three months with effect from the date of receipt of the order of extension by the Ayurvedic Council and Faculty.

It appears that many Kavirajes are unwilling to renew their registration as there are no rights and privileges attached to such registration similar to those enjoyed by the registered medical practitioners. The Government of Bengal would, however, assure them that the question of conferring on the registered Kavirajes certain rights and privileges is engaging the serious attention of Government, but as this is a matter which will take time to settle they expect that the Kavirajes will not make this a ground for severing their connection with the Faculty.

Government expect that in their own interest and in the interest of the Faculty the Kavirajes will renew their registration on payment of the prescribed fee within the extended period. Otherwise they will cease to be regarded as registered Kavirajes, lose their franchise and will not be able to participate in the next general election to the Ayurvedic Council.

Governments view of temporary pecuniary difficulties being the cause of the Kavirajes not renewing their registration is not convincing. For we know a large number of registered medical practitioners continue renewing their registration inspite of great pecuniary difficulties, and they do so only for the rights and privileges attached to their registration.

Kavirajes know as well that non-renewal of registration must deprive them of their franchise, and it therefore spells that their first registration fee becomes a loss to them; but they might have calculated that the first loss in the best loss. However great the pecuniary difficulties, the Kavirajes would never have failed to renew their registration had there been attached to the registration rights and privileges similar to those enjoyed by the registered medical practitioners.

Howbeit, we hope the Kavirajes will be wise enough to resolve at once this deadlock which would otherwise react on the Faculty itself, a Faculty that has been created with toils of many years. And although the Government are afraid that the settling of the matter of rights and privileges of registered practitioners will take time, it appears to us that this matter can be settled in course of only a weeks time if sufficient courage is taken and adequate attention is applied to it by all concerned.

Our greatest concern is for the Faculty of Homoeopathic Medicine in ovo. We pray the Government will very generously formulate the rights and privileges of the would-be registered Homoeopathic medical practitioners before implementing the General Council and Faculty for purposes of avoiding any chaos in future.

N C Bose