A STUDY OF LYCOPODIUM CLAVATUM


The Cyclopaedia of Drug Pathogenesis records thirtyone provings. Both sexes took part in these provings. The ages of the provers ranged all the way from one to fortyone years. Many of the provers were physicians. Both dilutions and triturations were used. The size of the doses also varied from one drop of the tincture to one hundred twenty drops; from one drop of the 30th to one hundred drops. Of the trituration, from one grain to ninty grains.


Makeup:

Poorly nourished; lethargic; lithic diathesis ; dyspeptic.

Location:

Digestive tract; especially liver; urinary organs; sexual organs; mucous membrane; blood; lungs and skin. It has a special affinity for the above, and in addition affects the brain and nervous system.

Sensations:

Fullness; distension; dryness; colicky; pressing; sharp; sticking.

Modalities:

Aggravated from eating cold foods, but especially from cabbage, beans, bread or any starchy food; before the menses; from four to eight P. M.; lamplight; in a warm close room. Ameliorated from fresh open air; after urinating ; warm drinks; nourishing food.

Leaders or Key Notes:

Red and-like sediment in the urine; flatulence while eating, or soon after; weakness due to malnutrition; dryness.

Preparation:

The drug should be especially prepared in order to become an effective remedy. Boericke says, “The drug is inert until the spores are crushed. Its wonderful medicinal properties are only disclosed by trituration and succussion”.

I never use anything but trituration, below the 30th.

Potency:

Lycopodium is a remedy which links preparation and potency closely together. The breaking up of the spores liberates the active principle of the drug. Again quoting Boericke “Both the lowest and highest potencies are credited with excellent results.” Hughes 27 says: “the highest attenuations are those most used in practice. I nearly always employ the twelfth.” Nash 36 says: “Its highest curative powers are not developed below the twelfth, hence neither the old school nor the homoeopathists who confine themselves exclusively to the low preparations, know much about it”.

I use from the 12th to the 6m, the 30th most frequently,

Proving:

The Cyclopaedia of Drug Pathogenesis records thirtyone provings. Both sexes took part in these provings. The ages of the provers ranged all the way from one to fortyone years. Many of the provers were physicians. Both dilutions and triturations were used. The size of the doses also varied from one drop of the tincture to one hundred twenty drops; from one drop of the 30th to one hundred drops. Of the trituration, from one grain to ninty grains. Five hundred drops of the tincture in four doses were taken in one day (twenty-four hours).

General Properties:

Before taking up the special groups I want to consider a few of the general properties of the drug. Hahnemann 22 called it one of the three great antipsorics ; the other two being Sulphur and Calcarea carb. Understanding Hahnemann 22 to mean by the above that these three remedies are most useful in the treatment of patients suffering from the several diathesis, my experience with Lycopodium leads me to most heartily agree with him.

The fact that it is an antipsoric makes it the ally of a large number of remedies. Allen 2 mentions sixteen. As an ally I have given it to prepare the patient for the indicated remedy; when the indicated remedy did not act or acted too slowly; and also to complete the restoration of health which the indicated remedy did not quite accomplish. This means that a thorough knowledge of Lycopodium necessitates a good working knowledge of its allies.

Lycopodium is one of our leading remedies. Malnutrition, either as a cause or effect, or both, is a prominent keynote of Lycopodium. In my study of the different groups of symptoms which make up the various conditions for which our remedy has been used, I have relied less upon textbooks which give the symptoms in a schematic form, than upon the reports of cases as found in these textbooks, and still more frequently in our medical journals. Furthermore, I have given greater weight to the writing (reports) of the busy practitioner than to those of the writers and teachers who have had little or no practical knowledge of the action of the remedy, who are theorists rather than practical men.

Only verified symptoms will be mentioned in this study and they will be given in the order of the rank they occupy in each individual group. I have always taught, that a symptom may hold the highest rank in one group and the lowest in another. This fact I have often seen demonstrated in the different groups of Lycopodium.

Digestive Tract.

There are several divisions of this caption, also sub- divisions.

Stomach:

Taking up the stomach first, let us make four sub- divisions, viz., flatulency, gastritis, gastralgia and dyspepsia. This order is not in accordance with the importance of the conditions, but because of the number of authorities who mentioned them. In fact to one inclined to generalize, the four would probably be reduced to two, viz., gastritis and dyspepsia. But then we would be obliged to divide dyspepsia into acrid, atonic and nervous, according to the cause.

Flatulency:

Although flatulency is but a symptom, yet so peculiar are its elements that eighteen of our authorities have mentioned it and a majority have stressed it. Flatulency is a prominent symptom in various groups of both gastralgia and gastritis.

George Royal
George Royal M. D, born July 15, 1853, graduated New York Homœopathic Medical College 1882, served as president of the American Institute of Homœopathy, professor of materia medica and therapeutics, and also dean of the College of Homœopathic Medicine of the State University of Iowa.