Activity upto death


His waiting-room is always occupied, and the last arrival has frequently to wait for hours for his turn. Hahnemann never curtails that thorough examination of patients so earnestly recommended by himself, so that every individual takes up longer time that is the case in the consulting-room of other physicians….


HIS BURIAL

SUPPLEMENT 177

HAHNEMANN IN PARIS

The “Allg. Anzeiger der Deutschen,” published in No.227 of the year 1837, a reprint of a letter from Paris, to which Boenninghausen refers in his letter of November 25the, 1837 (Supplement 141).

This was also reprinted in ‘Volksblatter fur homoopathisches Heilverfahren,” of C. E. Wahrhold, 1838, Vol. III, page 202, and the ‘allg. hom.Ztg.” `1837, vol. XII, page 120. The letter reads:

Since Hahnemann has been living in Paris very little authentic news about him comes to Germany, yet we hope that many of his numerous friends will be pleased to hear a little more in detail about his life and activity in the French capital; therefore the following news will be welcome.

Hahnemann lives at No. I. Rue de Milan, in a beautiful house with comfortable surroundings, such as he always liked. His outward appearance has remained almost unchanged, neither Paris nor old age have left any perceptible marks., Taking all things into consideration we may surmise that his mental and bodily activate will be maintained for a considerable length of time with rare vigor and vitality. It may be difficulty to decide whether his practice is as extensive ease some would as answer, who regret that his advanced age will have to succumb to impracticable exertions, or whether we may believe a calmer section of his followers who state that he has a very select practice, especially among the higher classes,. One thing is certain, and that is, that his waiting-room is always occupied, and the last arrival has frequently to wait for hours for his turn. Hahnemann never curtails that thorough examination of patients so earnestly recommended by himself, so that every individual takes up longer time that is the case in the consulting-room of other physicians. It is noticeable that Hahnemann now visits patients in the city which he could not easily be induced to do before. A regard for his health. which might be endangered no constant sitting is said to brave determined him to o this. The recognition of this greatness by the public is slight, if we take into consideration the appreciation given to his scientific views in general., and to his relation to the homoeopathic medical world in particular. It is relatively of the greatest importance for the contending and disputing parties and tendencies in homoeopathy, that the Founder does not seem at all incline to listen to instructions and additional facts proffered to him with more or less discretion for a along time, by a followers o his doctrines. Hahnemann wishes, firmly and definitely, that we should adhere to the truth not only of his generally accepted fundamental principal’s but also to that which is characteristic of him, that is, the rejection of of told traditional methods, the old pathology, and especially nosology, the protest against treatment based on names of disease, methods and connections in general, which link up with the old school.

This is not the place nor is it my intention to criticize the different parties in homoeopathy, and we must, therefore, pass over the reasons which make him the greatest scientific reformer known to history. We may, however, be permitted to state here that the question is far from being settled by the generally so-called scientific arguments, of which we have begun to have a super-abundance in homoeopathic literature, but the strict, yet not unscientific, procedure of Hahnemann’s fundamental principles, opens the way to an incalculable form of research, the results of which cannot yet be surmised. Unfortunately this partly has only one important representative, m Hahnemann himself: perhaps Boenninghausen may be added. At all events this mall number of adherents is to be regretted and can only be explained by reason of imperfect comprehension, on the part of the physicians, of the tremendous importance of this matter and the enormous difficult in carrying it out.

Richard Haehl
Richard M Haehl 1873 - 1932 MD, a German orthodox physician from Stuttgart and Kirchheim who converted to homeopathy, travelled to America to study homeopathy at the Hahnemann College of Philadelphia, to become the biographer of Samuel Hahnemann, and the Secretary of the German Homeopathic Society, the Hahnemannia.

Richard Haehl was also an editor and publisher of the homeopathic journal Allgemcine, and other homeopathic publications.

Haehl was responsible for saving many of the valuable artifacts of Samuel Hahnemann and retrieving the 6th edition of the Organon and publishing it in 1921.
Richard Haehl was the author of - Life and Work of Samuel Hahnemann