DISCUSSION ON THE TREATMENT OF INTERMITTENT FEVER


Is not QUININE the similimum to Intermittent Fever, par excellence? By QUININE, here, I mean, Sulphate of Quinia, Peruvian Bark, China, Cinchonidia, and others of that like. These are nearly identical so far as their pathogenetic or curative effects are concerned….


BY DR. E.A. Farrington, M.D., and others.

AT the December (1881) meeting of the Philadelphia County Homoeopathic Medical Society, the following discussion was held upon the treatment of Intermittent Fevers., the subject having been reported upon by the Bureau of Clinical Medicine and Zymoses:

Dr. McClatchey, having been invited by the President to open the discussion, did so as follows: “The Society will bear me out on the statement that my voice is not often heard in these discussions, and that I rarely refer to my cases,- least of all, to my cases. But I feel that I must not be silent, being called upon to speak, and must even do a little bragging too. On comparing may success in treating cases of Intermittent Fever, with that of others, that I hear or read about, I feel that I have been very successful.

I attribute my success entirely to this that I treat my cases Homoeopathically, rigidly adhering to the principle, similia similibus curantur in all cases. I follow the precepts of Hahnemann, and prescribe for the totality of symptoms. I individualize each case, and get all the symptoms together, those that are most prominent and those that are least so, the modalities, etc., and having done this, I choose that which is the Homoeopathic remedy for the case, and I find that this is in most cases, or at least, in a very large percentage of them, QUININE, and I believe that all my success in treating such cases is due to my close adherence to Homoeopathy

Is not QUININE the similimum to Intermittent Fever, par excellence? By QUININE, here, I mean, Sulphate of Quinia, Peruvian Bark, China, Cinchonidia, and others of that like. These are nearly identical so far as their pathogenetic or curative effects are concerned. I have heard quite a good many lectures on Homoeopathy, and one of the most frequently repeated statements, made on such occasions, was to the effect that Hahnemann, while engaged in translating Cullen’s Materia Medica into German, was dissatisfied with the explanation given by Mr. Cullen as to the action of Peruvian Bark in the cure of Ague, and that he set himself to experiment with that drug, and very greatly to his surprise, found that the drug, when taken by a person in good health, produced symptoms very similar to those produced in an attack of Ague.

This, together with other experiments, led to Hahnemann finding that drugs would cure symptoms similar to those that they were capable of producing, or similia similibus curantur. Thus Homoeopathy may be said to have had its foundations laid on Bark. Now was Hahnemann mistaken in all this? And if he was, is it not possible that he was mistaken in other things just as well, and might not Homoeopathy be an error altogether? But my experience proves to me that it is not, for just as Hahnemann found that Bark would produce symptoms analogous to those of Intermittent Fever, I have found that bark, or its alkaloid or alkaloids will cure genuine and true Malarial Intermittent Fever.

There are other remedies for Intermittents besides QUININE, as every physician knows, and it is not always necessary to give QUININE or China to cure Intermittent, as is also known to every physician. But there is not one, in my experience, so frequently indicated as QUININE, nor so often the similimum for a case of Ague. In that magnificent treatise, which we should all read daily, Allen’s Encyclopaedia of Materia Medica, you will find a complete record of the pathogenetic effects of QUININE and China, and in these records you will find nearly every symptom of a very large majority of Intermittent Fever cases.

E. A. Farrington
E. A. Farrington (1847-1885) was born in Williamsburg, NY, on January 1, 1847. He began his study of medicine under the preceptorship of his brother, Harvey W. Farrington, MD. In 1866 he graduated from the Homoeopathic Medical College of Pennsylvania. In 1867 he entered the Hahnemann Medical College, graduating in 1868. He entered practice immediately after his graduation, establishing himself on Mount Vernon Street. Books by Ernest Farrington: Clinical Materia Medica, Comparative Materia Medica, Lesser Writings With Therapeutic Hints.