PSORIASIS



Treatment. As underlying systemic causes seem to be the only constant factors, it is necessary that every item f personal hygiene should be investigated. If radical changes are necessary, they may be made gradually by adding in one instance or cutting off in another. Perhaps the diet may need in one instance or cutting off in another. Perhaps the diet may need to be regulated, and it is usually to improve gouty or rheumatic tendencies. Often an increase of vegetable food and a lessening of animal food is all that is necessary, but the usual tendency in early adult life, and even after, is to indulge in the too much food and too little water. Hyperacid states result especially in those leading sedentary lives, hence exercise must often be recommended as well as an improved dietary. Again, its is well to urge that exercise of all kinds should be that which a person most enjoys. Bathing has a much more beneficial effect upon psoriasis than upon eczema. The cold spray and the needle bath for a few moments at the end of an ordinary bath, or the cold pack occasionally, may be very beneficial by their action on the nervous system, while a Russian or Turkish bath once a week may be of considerable local value. For those who can afford it, a change of scene or climate is often value. For those who can afford it, a change of scene or climate is often desirable, because many cases improve in a warm climate during the winter months, especially if a course of bathing in some hot, natural spring may be taken. Outside of the numerous thermal establishments on the European continent, the Virginia and Arkansas Hot Springs, Mount Clemens and Crockett Springs (Virginia) have all given marked benefit to cases of psoriasis within my observation. Pure water, however, is to be preferred to the mineral waters for internal consumption. General tonic effects may be produced by galvanic, faradic and static currents but I prefer the high- frequency currents.

External Treatment. The first essential of local care is the removal of the scales, not only for the patient’s comfort, but also to aid in the eradication of the disease. When it is desirable to apply any medicaments to the surface, it is essential that the scales be first removed. This may be accomplished by ordinary soap and water, by the means of friction with-soft soap, or by prolonged alkaline or simple soap baths. In this connection, it is my custom to apply a saturated solution of sodium hyposulphite after the bath and if this be done upon retiring, a simple fat can thoroughly applied the following morning with such good effect that the more active local applications need not be used. The external remedies that are generally used are chrysarobin, used. The external remedies that are generally used are chrysarobin, tar, pyrogallic acid, salicylic acid, mercury, resorcin, and betanaphthol. Chrysarobin, which is the most rapidly efficient remedy, is a yellowish powder derived from the East Indies or Brazil. It can only be used in certain cases, however, because it stains the skin temporarily and the underclothing permanently, causes a severe dermatitis or if used upon the face, a conjunctivitis, and may even set up nephritis. Hence it is ideally employed upon the face, a conjunctivitis. It may be applied in ointment (40 to 60 grains to the ounce, or preferably as a paint. The addition of salicylic acid enhances its value but may not be well borne by sensitive skins. The following formulas may be employed:

R Chrysarobini, gr. xxx; 2

Pulv. amyli,

Pulv. zinci odidi, aa 3ij; 8

Petrolati, 3iv; 15 M.

R Acidi salicylici, 3ujss; 10

Frederick Dearborn
Dr Frederick Myers DEARBORN (1876-1960)
American homeopath, he directed several hospitals in New York.
Professor of dermatology.
Served as Lieut. Colonel during the 1st World War.
See his book online: American homeopathy in the world war